Yellow-tailed Black Cockatoo

Calyptorhynchus funereus

CONSERVATION STATUS

Least Concern

The yellow-tailed black cockatoo is a large species of cockatoo easily identified by its black plumage with bright yellow ear markings and tail panels.

They prefer eucalypt woodlands and pine plantations and the distinctive call of flocks can be heard as they fly above forest canopies.

Their conservation status is still secure in Victoria, however, their numbers are declining due to habitat loss and they are now considered vulnerable in South Australia.

WHAT THEY EAT

Yellow-tailed black cockatoos feed together in small to large flocks. They feed on seeds from native species of Hakea, Banksia and Casuarina, as well as introduced pine species. They also eat wood-boring insect larvae.

BREEDING

Breeding season varies according to climate and usually takes place between October and February in Victoria. They require large trees with hollows suitable for nesting. Both the male and female construct the nest, lining the hollow with woodchips. The female incubates one or two eggs while the male supplies her with food.

  • Location

    Dark green indicates where the Yellow-tailed Black Cockatoo can be found